The Dictionary of Health Economics, Second Edition
Show Less

The Dictionary of Health Economics, Second Edition

Anthony J. Culyer

This second edition of Culyer’s authoritative Dictionary of Health Economics brings the material up to date and adds large amounts of new information. Some definitions have been revised. There are over 700 new entries. The Dictionary now also contains extensive references to the literature to identify original source material or to provide illustrations of the headword in use.
Buy Book in Print
Show Summary Details
This content is available to you

Conventions

Anthony J. Culyer

Use of italics

Italicized terms in the text of entries, other than reference titles, are themselves entries in the Dictionary. Mention of an entry in another entry is italicized only at the first mention in any entry.

Cross-references

Cross-references are provided at the end of many entries. When there is more than one they are in alphabetical order. These are cross-references to substantive entries and not, for example, to mere synonyms or antonyms. These do not repeat cross-references indicated within the entry by italicized words. Cross-references are not impeded by plurals or other variations to the stems of words that are parts of speech. If a headword is a word in common use with everyday meanings its everyday use in the Dictionary will not be cross-referenced to the headword. Thus, ‘argument’ used in the sense of ‘persuasive case’ will not be cross-referenced to the headword ‘argument’. I have also made quite extensive use of the Latin imperative ‘confer’ (Cf.) at the end of entries to suggest other entries where there may be relevant comparators and ‘See’ to draw attention to related ideas.

Order of subject matter

Entries are in strict alphabetical order regardless of their nature.

References and websites

References are as full as it has been possible to make them, though I have eschewed authors’ first names. Some names are more complete (for example, in respect of initials) than those given in a cited reference. Websites were current at the time of writing.